Best Auto Body Shop in New Jersey

If you’re looking for an auto body shop in New Jersey make sure you give Peotters Tire & Auto a call as the New Jersey areas premier tire and brake shop. Today’s vehicles are made with many different types of fuel-saving materials like lightweight alloys and plastics. It is important for an auto body shop in New Jersey to be aware of the different materials and techniques used for repairing them.

Auto body shops like Peotter’s Tire and Auto and collision repair services refer to manuals for instructions repairing bumpers. The different material types require various finish materials, removal and installation procedures.

Bumper Repairs

When a plastic bumper is cracked or has a small hole it can be repaired to look as good as new. Replacing the bumper is wasteful and it creates unnecessary debris for our landfills.

A good, eco-friendly auto body shop in New Jersey will only recommend replacing the bumper if the damage is severe enough that repair time would be considered unreasonable and quality of results would be unsatisfactory.

Without knowing what to look for, choosing a quality auto body shop is tough. It's important to select the right auto shop to ensure the vehicle is fixed correctly the first time. It's also the best way to make sure the shop is honest and reliable. There are many important features of a good shop, including an experienced staff and certifications. It can also help to read customer reviews before making a selection.

A Certified Shop

A good body shop is certified by the largest auto organization. Facilities that gain the approval of the organization have proven their abilities as certification is often a lengthy process. To become approved, an auto shop must demonstrate it has the latest equipment, qualified technicians and a proper facility. It must also show it offers above average training to its employees. Larger associations always collect feedback from prior customers as well before issuing an approval. Auto shops can also receive certification from parts manufacturers and organizations like Autobody Alliance, which requires the shop to meet certain qualifications.

Qualified and Experienced Staff

A good auto body shop has qualified staff with a number of certifications. Certification from ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) is especially important. ASE is a non-profit organization that offers certifications to automobile technicians that show proficiency in their trade. Technicians may also have certification from car manufacturers like GM, Chrysler, Toyota and Nissan, showing their knowledge and experience dealing with particular car brands. Some auto technicians also receive aftermarket training from Bendix, Moog, or NAPA. Most training requires a great deal of knowledge and experience and demonstrates a technician is a professional in their field.

Positive Customer Reviews

When possible, former clients should be consulted about their experience with the shop. Some resources to find reviews are online, making it easy to decide if a body shop has good feedback from the public. Reviews should mention that the vehicle was fixed properly the first time and work was completed in a timely fashion. Positive reviews should also discuss whether a warranty was offered by the body shop and if the facility was clean and orderly. A facility that has the approval of a large automobile association has shown a history of positive feedback from customers, although it's always a good idea to check into a shop as much as possible.

Accepts All Insurance

Another important aspect of a good body shop is its acceptance of all forms on insurance. An auto body shop that accepts all insurance providers demonstrates it has experience working with insurance companies to settle claims quickly. A shop that is hesitant to accept major insurance providers is a red flag that something may be wrong. This is also a matter of convenience and makes it easier for the vehicle owner to select a shop they feel comfortable with.

Selecting the right auto body shop requires a bit of patience and consideration. For example, choosing the first shop available can be a disaster if the employees aren't trained properly. A good auto shop is clean and up-to-date with a friendly and knowledgeable staff. The shop should have positive reviews and a range of certifications for both the facility and technicians. It should also accept all forms of insurance, making repairs easy and convenient.

The cost of repairing small abrasions, cracks and holes in plastic bumpers is often much cheaper than replacing the part.

Paint And Body Shop

Of course, many collision repair technicians would rather replace the part and charge a fee for their labor plus mark-up on the price of the part because they lack in cosmetic repair skills and it is easier to warranty the work.

Working with Plastics

The first step to repairing plastic bumpers is to identify the material in order to choose the method of repair. Auto body shops use ISO codes on the parts to identify the various families of plastics. They cross-reference the codes with charts from the suppliers or by accessing reference materials on the internet.

It is important that the collision repair technician determine the type of plastic they are working with so they know the proper welding procedure to use to avoid damage to the part.

Some plastics can be welded with an airless welder or hot-air welder; others require a hot glue type of procedure. Tests must be performed and welding procedures have to be done correctly to avoid adhesion failure. Some bumpers will melt with a slight color change and they will remain tacky in the area where they have melted.

Adhesive Repairs

The bumper repair technician must identify the type of plastic they are working with in order to be successful with adhesive repairs. Failure to properly identify the plastic results in adhesion-related problems.

Flexibility

Some repair materials are based on flexible and rigid plastics. Using the wrong material can cause cracking when the part is flexed or it may not provide the correct strength for the repair area.

Cleaning and Prep

Proper cleaning and prep is critical for proper adhesion and finish. Whether the technician is repairing or replacing the bumper, the part will need to be cleaned. The bumper being repaired is likely to be dirty from the road; the new replacement part can have contamination on it from the manufacturing process.

Auto body repair professionals should use a low-VOC surface cleaner or a special plastics parts cleaner to help prevent solvents from going too deep into the plastic. If solvents are too harsh, they go deep into the plastic and cause adhesion problems after repairs are done.

This is an overview of the process of working with plastics. Time is money in the auto body industry; therefore, many collision repair technicians choose to replace rather than repair plastic bumpers and other parts.

Technology allows us to repair many items that are often replaced. As resources become scarce and landfills become over-full, we really should consider repairing rather than replacing when possible.

Who Really IS the Best Auto Body Shop in New Jersey ?

Wild Country Tires

- Hey Youtubers, Donnie Smith here, and welcome to my videoseries on auto estimating.

This series, we're gonna talk about how to write estimates on cars, you know, cars that have been in a wreck or has got a dent.

How do you write an estimate? (screeching) (boom) So to kick this video off, I'm gonna start it with a quote.

It says "organization is what you do before you do something,so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up.

" So in this first lesson we're just gonna talk about estimates, what are estimates, supplements, how they're generated,who needs estimators, and kinda setting up yourestimating environment.

As an estimator, it'simportant to fully understand what all the purposes an estimate serves.

And it's also important to properly set up your estimating environment to become efficient at generatingthorough auto estimates.

And this also includes the ASE A1 Position thevehicle for inspection.

So what are estimates? I mean estimates, they'recalled different things, like a damage report, damage estimate, auto estimate, but they arebasically the same thing.

A damage estimate however, is more than just a sheet of paperlisting the total cost of the repairs.

An estimate is a contractor a mutual agreement between two people.

As with real estate,the owner and the buyer, they must agree on a price,and they sign the document, the contract and it's a mutual agreement, and a auto estimate, youknow, it's the same way.

There needs to be an agreement between the repair shop and the customer and the customer shouldsign that agreement to authorize the repairs.

Now one thing that the estimator needs to explain to the customer, and this is somethingthat's really misunderstood, is the estimate, it is just an estimate.

It could change, it'snot the final invoice.

A lot of things could factor into this.

Maybe there was some hidden damage.

Well, of course, they wouldneed to contact the customer and let 'em know, but it isgonna change the estimate total.

Maybe there was a price increase on parts, maybe that changed.

There's a lot of things that may make the finalinvoice a different price than the estimate was,and you as an estimator need to explain this tothe customer up front so they understand.

Any additional charges, you're gonna need to write a supplement.

The customer needs to understand this, and a lot of times you're dealing with insurance companies as well, and of course, they arefamiliar with the process.

And not only do you need to have good communication skills with the customer, you're also gonna have to work with the insurance, in many cases.

Not every job is an insurance job, but a big percentage of 'em are, so you need to be able to communicate well with the insurance company.

Now every insurance company,that's gonna be different, the way they do it.

Do you pick up a phone, call 'em, are you a direct repair show for 'em, that is gonna vary a lot.

But whatever procedure you do use, your shop, the insurance company, whatever relationship you have, it's gonna be your responsibility to make sure that the insurance company and the customer, that you communicate with them and they allknow what is going on.

Now the insurance companymay be paying for everything, everything except the deductible in some of these jobs, but keep in mind, the owner of the car,that is your customer.

That's the one that's gonna bring it back to you if they have problems, have another accidentor anything like that, so keep in mind that you'reworking for the customer, the car owner.

It's your responsibilityas the repair shop, to repair that car back to its pre-accidental condition.

So once everybody agreesto the supplements, the additional charges,the insurance company and the customer, now you can include these additional chargesinto the final invoice.

So there's different methodsfor writing estimates.

For a long time, Iremember whenever I started writing estimates, it was all by hand, using Mitchell manuals is what we used.

I'm sure there was other books as well, estimating guides, but we'd have to look up the car, then we'd have to look up the part, and we'd manually write all that in, write the price in, the labor for it, andthat took a lot of time.

Nowadays, they have computer estimates.

It's a lot faster, youput all the information into the computer, and it'smore of a point and click.

But even though they haveall the computers today, I still think it's important, if you're interested in estimating, I still think it's very important to learn to write one by hand.

Now the reason I say this is, you wanna understand the process cause a lot of the computer systems, they will deduct for overlap, for example.

They'll just automatically put that in.

Well you don't have to worry about it because it puts it in, but if you never understandthe process and why, you don't wanna look dumb to the customer.

Maybe the customer says "Well, what's this deduct for overlap?" You don't wanna just tell 'em.

"Ah, don't worry about it, the computer puts that in there.

I don't know what it is.

" You can honestly sitthere and explain to 'em, because you know the procedure and why it deducted for overlap.

And I think the better understanding of the procedures you have, the better estimator you're gonna be, the less un-includeditems you're gonna miss, and I think it's gonna make you a much better estimator, to understand the full process.

Now there is a sequence to estimating.

Most guides, like the Mitchell, the guides they have.

We use use CCC now, thecomputer system, CCC 1.

There is a sequence thatmost of these follow.

Now I don't know every system out there, but all the ones thatI use have a sequence, and it starts with the front bumper cover and ends with the rear bumper cover, so it starts from front to back.

So when you're writing an estimate, of course, you wanna startwith the front panels and move backwards, so youcan have the same sequence, so when you go to the computer, or if you're using an estimating guide, you can just follow that sequence, make it much easier forya, not flipping' around.

So follow that sequencefrom front to rear.

Now there's also anothersequence that it follows, and that's from outside to inside.

So for example, the front bumper cover, of course the bumpercover's on the outside, that's gonna be first.

Well, what's underneath that bumper cover? Well there's a impact absorber.

There's a reinforcement bar.

And it just kinda goes from outside to in for each part group.

So who needs estimators? Well, basically every repair shop.

Every body shop, dealershipthat repairs cars, they're gonna need an estimator and they need someone thatcan write the estimates, they can go talk to the customers, they can look at the car, and be able to writethe estimates for them, and also insurance companies, they also need a, theymay call 'em appraisers or estimators, they need people that will go and look at these cars and write the damage report for 'em.

Now smaller shops, you know, body shops, it may be the owner, itmight be the manager, the foreman that writes these estimates, but a lot of your larger shops, they have people just for estimating and some shops have multiple estimators.

And again, the title for this, it varies.

There is tons of them, customer advisor, a lot of dealerships and body shops call 'em different things, but it's basically someone that visits with the customer, you'reusually the first contact, that sees the customer, and you go and look at the car, andyou basically communicate with them for the entire process, from the time you write the estimate to take the keys and givethe keys back to 'em.

So it is very, veryimportant for this position if you're considering this as a career, it's very important to havevery good communication skills.

Now let's talk about settingup the work environment.

As with any workenvironment, it's important to be set up properly.

If you wanna be able to write estimates, generate estimates,thoroughly and efficiently, you need to be set up properly.

Now I remember when I usedto write a lot of estimates, I just wrote 'em out in the parking lot, and I'm sure there's still a lot of shops that do that, but if you have a stall set up for estimating, it's really gonna simplify the process and it's really gonna minimize the amount of supplements that you have.

And I think whenever inspecting a car, good lighting is very important and even if you have good lighting, or you're out in the parking lot, you know sunlight, that's good lighting, but there always are gonna be areas in these cars, maybe you gotta look up under the dash, or maybe you need to crawl up under the carand look at something, you really need aflashlight, a good flashlight to look at these things.

Because if you can't see inthose dark areas too good, it's really gonna be hardto determine what's wrong, and probably this is gonnalead to a supplement, once you tear it down, and that's something you wanna eliminate The less supplements, the better, which we'll talk about that more later.

And many times, the estimator's gonna need to inspect underneath the car.

Now if you have a stall set up, and you have a lift and everything, that works really good.

But not all shop estimatingstalls have that, but you do need to have a, nearby, in your stall, you need to have to have a jackand some jack stands, that if you do need to lift it up, that you can crawl under there to look at some suspension parts or something that may be damaged.

And it's also important to be well organized in your work area.

Be organized, clean, andprovide a easy workflow, to move cars in and out.

It'd take up a lot of time if you have to shuffle cars around, you pull a car in, you're in the middle of estimating it, you have to back it outto let another car out.

If possible, you don'twanna be in that situation, so have your stall setup to where you can pull a car in there and leave it, and it does not disturb the rest of the workflow with the rest of the shop.

And also stay organized.

You need to have the tools that you need.

You don't wanna haveto go through the shop, borrowing tools fromdifferent body techs in there.

Have the tools that you need.

You're gonna just need some basic tools, if you might have to do alittle bit of tear-down, but have your own tools set up in there, have your jack stands, your jack, for the things thatyou're gonna need to do.

Cause it's not gonnalook very professional if you're trying to write an estimate and you're running through the shop or going to grab a technician to come and jack the car up and all that.

So just be sure that you havethe things that you need, and make sure in your estimating area that everything has aplace, and that's it's in place when you're not using it.

So what tools do youneed in your work area? Well this is really gonna vary, depending on your shopand the shop's procedures and how they do write their estimates, it's gonna vary, but I'm gonna give you some common tools that most of you will have to use.

The estimator's gonna haveto take photos of the damage, photos to help others seewhat the estimate sees.

They need to tell a story.

Photos are documents to prove the extent of the damage to the customers and to the insurance company.

You need to take photosof the overall damage, just a big picture of what happened, but you also need to take photos of the individual parts that are damaged.

Now I've used iPhones, cell phones, they work good, but youknow Larry Montanez, he's a consultant, and he says you really need a better camera, a high-quality camera,one that can zoom in, especially like on someof your individual parts where you need a really good picture, he thinks probably youneed a higher-end camera.

And especially a lot of the repair shops working directly withthe insurance company, just from the photos, soit probably is a good idea to have a high-qualitycamera to take these photos.

And I remember whenever Iwas an insurance adjuster, we used to use a 35-millimeter cameras, and we'd take these pictures, and we would have to go get 'em developed, and that was pretty expensive.

I mean today, it is so simple.

You just take a picture,plug it into the computer, and there it is, and you can send it to the insurance company, the customer, or whoever.

And another good thingabout having a camera.

Most cameras, most cell phones, sometimes you may need to take a video.

I mean a video may tell the story better than just a still picture.

So most cell phones andcameras have the capability to take a quick video clipof what you're talking about, maybe you can point at something or talk about what you'retrying to point out, and sometimes that mightbe the easiest thing to do.

And of course, like I mentioned earlier, you need good lighting, and part of that, you're gonna need a flashlight because some of those places, I don't care how good the lighting is, you're gonna need a flashlight to see some of those dark areas.

Now you're gonna need some hand tools.

You're probably not gonna need a full, roll-around box like alot of your techs have, but just some basic tools, screwdrivers, wrenches,sockets, trim tools, just some of those basic things.

Maybe you need to take a bumper cover off or a door panel, just enough tools to get that off, justsome basic hand tools.

And you're just gonnaneed a paint mil gauge, and this just basically measures the paint to let you know are yougonna have to strip, partial strip, or you can youjust final sand and paint, because that's gonna determinethe cost of the estimate.

And it's also a good ideato have a body filler gauge or magnet to determine the area that you're gonna be working on, has it got prior damage or body filler, that may eliminates some problems that you could run into.

And you're gonna needsome measuring equipment, a tape measure and tram gauge, for sure, and there might be caseswhere you really need to put it on the frame machine, and get a computerized reading of the extent of the damage.

And you're gonna need a scan tool.

A lot of times with yourelectrical components, you don't know until you scan it, so you'll need a scan tool so that you can read the codes.

And you're gonna need estimating guides or a computerized system, so that you can get the parts prices, the labor times and all that, probably just about everybody has moved to computerized systems.

I know CCC 1, Mitchell,and there's others too, but you're gonna need something like that or there might still bea few shops out there that do use the estimating guide, smaller shops that don'tdo a lot of volume, they may use the estimating guides, but you're gonna need something that you can look up the car, get the price of the parts, and the labor time for those parts.

And you're gonna need some office supplies to write customers' names down, and notes that you'regonna take during the day, there's gonna be a lot of them.

You need pencils and pens and notepads, things like that.

You're also gonna need a place for your computer, of course, and you're gonna need a phone.

You are gonna be on the phone a lot.

You're gonna be calling theinsurance companies, customers, updating them on theprogress of their car, so you need to have an area that you can concentrate in and have a phone availablewhen you need it.

And you're gonna need an area to consult with customers.

Now this may be the areawhere you write the estimates and all that or maybe a separate area.

It's just going to depend on your shop and how they're set upand how they do that, but you're gonna need an area to consult with the customers, talk to them, and explainthe process to 'em, and explain the estimate to 'em, and hopefully sell the job to 'em.

And I know there are someshops that even have an area for the insurance adjusters, they have their own areato generate estimates and to consult with customers.

As always, I appreciate youfor watching these videos.

I hope you enjoyed the lesson about auto estimating.

I hope that you learned some from that.

And if you did, if you liked the video, be sure and give me athumbs up, give me a like, subscribe to us if youhaven't subscribed to it.

Share this with your friends and if you have any questions or comments, just be sure and go down below this video in the comments section, and there you can leavea question or a comment.

And remember, if something's worth doing, do your best and have a blast doing it.

Thanks for watching.

Take care, and we'll see you in the next video.

(rock music).

Auto Body Repair: Pull on a 2005 Ford Focus

Auto Repair Estimate

>>> WELL, IF YOUR CAR IS EVER DAMAGED IN AN ACCIDENT OR REPAIRED THROUGH MAJOR INSURANCE COMPANY IN THIS COUNTRY, THERE ARE STATE AND FEDERAL LAWSUITS IN THIS COUNTRY YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT.

AUTO BODY SHOPS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, MORE THAN 500 OF THEM CLAIM SOME BIG INSURANCE COMPANIES LONG DELIBERATELY SKIMPED WHEN IT COMES TO REPAIR DAMAGED VEHICLES.

ALSO, THE INSURANCE COMPANIES CAN HAVE THEIR PROFITS.

THE LAWSUITS ALLEGE IT'S A SCHEME THAT CANNOT ONLY LEAD TO RUSHED AND MINIMAL REPAIRS BUT RECYCLED, REMANUFACTURED AND ONE LAWYER PUTS IT JUNKED PARTS TO FIX YOUR CAR.

ATTORNEY GENERAL BELIEVES THE ALLEGED SCHEME YOU COULD BE DRIVING A DANGEROUS CAR.

CNN SENIOR INVESTIGATIVE CORRESPONDENT DREW GRIFFIN REPORTS.

>> Reporter: TO SEE WHAT'S REALLY GOING ON, YOU'VE GOT TO DO SOMETHING YOU PROBABLY CAN'T DO AT HOME.

LIFT WHAT YOU THINK IS YOUR REPAIR CAR, GET OUT SOMETHING CALLED A BORROW SCOPE AND CHECK THE FRAME TO SEE IF THE AUTO BODY SHOP FIXED IT, WHAT YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY LIKELY RECOMMENDED.

>> THERE'S THE RIFF IN THE RAIL.

>> Reporter: BILL BURN, A NATIONAL AUTO REPAIR EXPERT TESTIFIES ABOUT BAD REPAIRS AND THIS, HE SAID, IS ONE OF THEM.

THE RESULT OF A SYSTEM DESIGNED TO SAVE MONEY FOR INSURANCE COMPANIES.

>> WHAT THEY DID WAS REPLACED THE NEW END CAP ON THERE AND THE END CAP COVERS THAT, SO THE CONSUMER WOULD NEVER SEE THIS.

IT IS UNSAFE.

>> AND YET THEY PUT IT BACK.

>> CORRECT.

>> Reporter: BURN IS NOW PART OF THE MAJOR LAWSUIT INVOLVING MORE THAN 500 AUTO BODY SHOPS IN 36 STATES.

ALL SUING DOZENS OF INSURANCE COMPANIES ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

THE SHOPS BELIEVE THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY IS INVOLVED IN A DELIBERATE SYSTEM TO SEND YOU AND YOUR CAR TO SHOPS THAT ARE PRESELECTED BY INSURERS TO DO THE ABSOLUTE BARE MINIMUM TO FIX IT.

EVEN TELLING BODY SHOPS TO USE USED OR RECYCLED PARTS BECAUSE THEY'RE CHEAPER.

MATT PARKER IS AN AUTO SHOP OWNER IN MONROE, LOUISIANA, WHO SAID HE SEES THE SAME PROBLEM.

HE SAID STATE FARM TOLD HIM TO USE A REMANUFACTURED HEADLIGHT IN A TOYOTA TACOMA.

THIS IS WHAT HE GOT.

>> IT'S GOT A HOLE IN IT HERE AND THEN YOU CAN SEE WHERE THEY SCREWED THIS BRACKET BACK ON THE VEHICLE.

NOW, YOU CAN SEE HERE WHERE ALL THESE PARTS WERE KNOCKED OFF AND GLUED BACK TOGETHER.

YOU CAN ALSO SEE HERE WHERE THE TOP CORNER AND THE LENS IS BUSTED AND THIS PART OF THE HEADLIGHT IS BROKEN.

THIS CAME OUT OF A BOX WRAPPED LIKE IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE -- ABSOLUTELY, LIKE A NEW PART.

THE INSURANCE COMPANY WANTS US TO PUT THIS STUFF ON THE CAR.

IF WE REFUSE TO PUT IT ON THE CAR, THEN THEY LABEL US AS A SHOP NOT WILLING TO GO ALONG WITH THEIR PROGRAM AND THEN TRY TO STEER OUR BUSINESS AWAY FROM US.

>> Reporter: THIS IS WHY HE AND THE OTHER SHOPS RETAINED JOHN ARTHUR EVES TO SUE.

>> EVERY STATE IN THE UNION IS EXPERIENCING THE SAME SORT OF STRUGGLE HERE BETWEEN THE BODY SHOPS TRYING TO DO AND INSURANCE COMPANY TRYING TO USE UNSAFE PARTS AND METHODS ON THEIR CARS.

>> Reporter: BUDDY CALDWELL OF LOUISIANA BELIEVE IT TOO.

PREPARING A LAWSUIT.

LOUISIANA FILED CLAIMING STATE FARM'S PRACTICE IS PUTTING DRIVERS IN DANGER.

AND WHAT IS THE PRACTICE? WHAT'S BEING PUT IN THEIR CARS? >> AFTERMARKET PARTS, JUNK YARD PARTS AND ALL OF THIS WITHOUT ANY COMMUNICATION WITH THE CONSUMER AND THAT'S THE MAIN ISSUE, THE SAFETY ISSUES AND THE KNOWLEDGE THAT THEIR PRODUCT IS BEING DEVALUED BY THE PRACTICES OF THE INSURANCE COMPANY.

I MEAN, BUDDY HAS FOUND NUMEROUS CASES HERE IN LOUISIANA.

WE FOUND IN MISSISSIPPI, THE BODY SHOPS, PUT JUNK PARTS AND WELD THE PATCH.

>> Reporter: WHEN AUTO SHOPS DON'T GO ALONG, MISSISSIPPI'S ATTORNEY GENERAL SAID THOSE AUTO SHOPS BUSINESS GETS CUT.

IT'S CALLED STEERING.

INSURANCE COMPANIES STEERING BUSINESS ELSEWHERE.

>> THEY'RE GOING TO SAY, WE'LL BLACKBALL YOU.

WE WON'T PUT YOU ON OUR SELECT SERVICE LIST AND WE'RE GOING TO MAKE YOU SEND ESTIMATESTOUS TO FIVE TIMES.

>> Reporter: U.

S.

SENATOR RICHARD BLOOMEN THAT WILL WHO USED TO BE CONNECTICUT'S ATTORNEY GENERAL NOT ONLY THE POTENTIAL FOR SMALL BUSINESS TO BE HURT BUT BELIEVE CARS REPAIRED THROUGH THE PREFERRED SERVICE CENTERS PROPOSE A SAFETY RISK AND ASKED THE U.

S.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE TO INVESTIGATE.

>> SALVAGE PARTS INFERIOR OR EVEN COUNTERFEIT PARTS RAISE SAFETY CONCERNS AND OFTEN, THOSE KIND OF PARTS INVOLVED IN THE PRACTICE OF STEERING AND THAT'S WHY I HAVE BEEN CONCERNED FOR YEARS ABOUT IT.

AND WHY I THINK THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SHOULD BE INVESTIGATING.

>> Reporter: LOUISIANA'S ATTORNEY GENERAL CHOSE STATE FARM BECAUSE THEY'RE THE BIGGEST INSURER IN HIS STATE AND LEGAL FILINGS, THE COMPANY DENIES ALL THE ALLEGATIONS INCLUDING THE ALLEGATION THAT STATE FARM MANDATES USING AFTERMARKET PARTS.

STATE FARM WOULD NOT GRANT INTERVIEW BUT SENT A STATEMENT INSTEAD.

IT SAID OUR CUSTOMERS CHOOSE WHERE THEIR VEHICLES ARE GOING TO BE REPAIRED.

WE PROVIDE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR SELECT SERVICE PROGRAM WHILE AT THE SAME TIME MAKING IT CLEAR THEY CAN SELECT WHICH SHOP WILL DO THE WORK.

STATE FARM TOLD US TO BRING OUR SPECIFIC QUESTIONS TO NEIL OLRIDGE WITH THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANIES.

>> IT'S NOT JUST IN THE ECONOMIC INTEREST OF THE INSURER TO HAVE A CAR GO IN AND OUT OF AN AUTO BODY SHOP FOUR OR FIVE TIMES TO GET IT RIGHT.

>> Reporter: WHY WOULD THEY RECOMMEND USED PARTS, FIXED PARTS OFF MARKET? >> SURE.

MOST COMPANIES DON'T REQUIRE THIS.

MOST COMPANIES OFFER A CHOICE TO CONSUMERS.

MOST OF THE ANY SORT OF AFTERMARKET PART YOU MIGHT HEAR ABOUT ARE USUALLY COSMETIC PARTS.

NOTHING RELATED TO THE SAFETY, THE MECHANICAL PARTS OF THE OPERATION OF THE VEHICLE.

THERE ARE LAWS IN ALMOST EVERY STATE THAT REQUIRE CONSUMERS TO BE TOLD THAT IF AFTERMARKET PARKTS ARE USED AND WHAT THEY ARE.

>> Reporter: WE FOUND THIS NOTICE ON PAGE FOUR OF THE ESTIMATE ON PAGE SIX OF THIS ONE.

>> IN MANY CASES, THESE PARTS ARE NO DIFFERENT.

THEY'RE MADE ON THE SAME FACTORIES.

ONE JUST COMES OUT WITH AN AUTO MANUFAC MANUFACTURER'S NAME ON IT AND OTHERS DON'T.

>> THAT'S NOT TRUE.

>> IT IS TRUE.

>> Reporter: IT CERTAINLY ISN'T TRUE IN THE CASE OF THIS REPLACEMENT HOOD FOR A HONDA MADE IN TAIWAN AND ALREADY COMING APART.

THIS AFTERMARKET BUMPER STRAIGHT OUT OF THE BOX NOT ONLY DOESN'T FIT BUT THE FASTENERS HAVE BEEN GLUED BACK TOGETHER AND THEN THERE'S THE QUESTION ABOUT THAT BROKEN AND REPAIRED TOYOTA TACOMA HEAD LAMP.

>> IT'S OBVIOUSLY A REPURPOSED PART FROM A JUNK YARD AND IF YOU LOOK CLOSELY, YOU'LL SEE HOW IT WAS GLUED TOGETHER, SNAPPED TOGETHER AND IN SOME CASES, EVEN WELDED AND SCREWED TOGETHER AND THIS IS WHAT THE INSURER TOLD THE PREFERRED BODY SHOP TO PUT ON THE CAR.

LOOK AT THIS.

YOU WOULDN'T WANT THAT IN YOUR CAR, I WOULDN'T WANT THAT IN MY CAR.

>> I DON'T KNOW THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE PICTURE, SO I REALLY CAN'T COMMENT ON IT.

>> Reporter: SO ARE THE ATTORNEY GENERALS WRONG IN SAYING THAT THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE, STATE FARM IN PARTICULAR, IS STEERING THEIR CUSTOMERS TO PREFERRED BODY SHOPS, PREFERRED BECAUSE THEY SAVE THE INSURANCE COMPANY MONEY, NOT THE CONSUMER? >> THE INSURANCE COMPANY MAY PROVIDE A LIST OF AUTO BODY SHOPS.

AND THE CUSTOMER CAN SAY NO, I WANT TO GO TO JOE'S BODY SHOP AROUND THE CORNER AND THAT'S THE CHOICE.

>> Reporter: THAT'S WHAT PROGRESSIVE INSURANCE TOLD US HAPPENED FOR THIS CAR.

REMEMBER, IT'S THE CAR WE TOLD YOU ABOUT EARLIER WITH THE RIP TAIL FRAME THAT YOU COULD ONLY SPOT WITH THE BOROSCOPE.

ONLY HIT FROM BEHIND.

A PREFERRED BODY SHOP AND SENT BACK ON THE ROAD WITH A RIPPED AND HIDDEN TAIL FRAME.

TURNS OUT IT WASN'T OLD, NOT REPAIRED.

THREE OF FOUR TIRE RIMS ARE DAMAGED AND THE UNDERCARRIAGE OF THE CAR IS PUSHED IN ACCORDING TO AUTO EXPERT BILL BURN AND OUTSIDE, THE PAINT JOB IS FILLED WITH POCKMARKS.

PROGRESSIVE INSURANCE SAY THEY DIDN'T CHOOSE THE BODY SHOP, THE OWNER DID.

WELL, THIS IS THE OWNER.

EUG EUGENEA RANDALL WHO NEEDS THE CAR TO CARRY HER 2-YEAR-OLD SON ROMAN AND REMEMBERS THE CONVERSATION WITH PROGRESSIVE MUCH DIFFERENTLY.

>> THEY DIDN'T GIVE ME A CHOICE AS TO WHERE I WANTED TO TAKE IT.

THEY JUST TOLD ME TO TAKE IT TO THEIR PREFERRED SHOP.

>> Reporter: RANDLE SAID BECAUSE IT WAS A PREFERRED SHOP, IT WOULD BE REPAIRED TO A HIGHER STANDARD BUT WHEN SHE PICKED IT UP, SHE IMMEDIATELY KNEW SOMETHING WASN'T RIGHT.

>> COSMETICALLY TO ME IT LOOKED FINE BUT ONCE I GOT IN AND GOT DOWN THE STREET, IT JUST STARTED DRIVING REALLY CRAZY AND I IMMEDIATELY TOOK IT BACK.

>> Reporter: SO HOW CRAZY WAS RANDLE'S CAR DRIVING? I DECIDED TO FIND OUT FOR MYSELF BY GETTING BEHIND THE WHEEL.

>> ANYTHING OVER 50 MILES PER HOUR, THIS THING JUST SHAKES.

THIS THING IS REALLY SHAKING NOW.

>> Reporter: NOT ONLY THE TAIL SECTION RIPPED AN UNREPAIRED, THREE OF FOUR TIRE RIMS DAMAGED AND AS I DROVE, THE STEERING WHEEL SHAKING SO VIOLENTLY, I HAD TO GRIP DOWN FROM VEERING TO THE RIGHT.

THE FRONT LEFT TIRE WAS JUST WOBBLING.

I CAREFULLY DROVE THIS SHAKING CAR RIGHT BACK TO THE INSURANCE COMPANY'S PREFERRED AUTO BODY SHOP.

WHERE THE GENERAL MANAGER PROMPTLY TOLD US TO LEAVE.

>> DON'T TURN THAT ON WITHOUT THE SERVICE PERMISSION IF YOU DON'T MIND.

>> Reporter: AS FOR THE SHAKING CAR, THE INSURANCE COMPANY EVENTUALLY DECLARED IT A TOTAL LOSS GIVING HER FULL REPLACEMENT VALUE.

BUT ONLY AFTER SHE HIRED AN ATTORNEY AND CNN BEGAN INVESTIGATING THIS STORY.

>> THE VEHICLE SPUN OUT.

>> UNBELIEVABLE.

DREW GRIFFIN JOINING US NOW.

I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT THIS WHOLE PLAN THEY HAVE.

DID THE REPAIR COMPANY THAT SUPPOSEDLY FIXED THE SHAKING CAR EVER GIVE AN EXPLANATION? >> Reporter: THE COMPANY SERVICE KING SAID THEY DID WHAT THE INSURANCE COMPANY APPROVED AND SAID ALL THEIR REPAIRS COME WITH A WRITTEN LIFETIME WARRANTY.

SERVICE KING'S CORPORATE OFFICE SAID IT WAS UNAWARE THERE WERE PROBLEMS OR COMPLAINTS AND.


Brake Check in New Jersey

It happens to all of us at one point in time. We get into an automobile collision and need the best auto body shop in New Jersey. Hopefully, it is not too bad and we are not seriously injured. But usually the car does not fare as well and comes away with significant damage.

What is the next step after your collision and you need an auto body shop?

Likely, after informing the insurance company you take your vehicle to one of their “approved” vendors.

Here is what happens next. You tell the insurance company what company you choose. By this time they have already taken phones of the car and know how extensive the damage is. If you need an expert to take a look, make sure you go to a repair shop in New Jersey. 

They have a computer system that gives them a printed estimate stating what the replacement parts and labor will be based upon a set hourly rate.

This statement is given to the body shop. It comes with a break down of what the labor and parts “should” be and the company has to usually be able to totally fix the car for that price.

Secrets of the Auto Body Shop

Keep in mind that what is printed out represents the best case scenario and doesn’t allow for items on the car that was missed or problems that come up.

Now here are some things to watch out for. a local auto body shop in New Jersey is operating under very, very thin margins and the incentive to “cut corners” is huge. Getting an extra $300 off a job can really add up over the course of the month when you are talking about doing at least 3-5 vehicles every week.

Fake Auto Body Repair Scheme Targets Victims With Dents In Cars

Replacement Parts in Auto Body Shops

Make sure the parts being used on your car are OEM parts. These are replacement auto body parts in New Jersey are sent directly from the car manufacturers and are designed with the same specs as the vehicle came with.

Tire Finder

Aftermarket parts can be significantly cheaper yet are not the same quality and make not hold up the same in the event of another accident.

No Realignment? Talk to Your Auto Repair Team!

The frame is usually somewhat bent when a car goes through an accident of any kind. It needs to be properly realigned. You need a serious all hands on deck auto body shop to take care of you here.

Unfortunately, because the money made off one car can be very little the propensity to skip this step is very high. Later down the road this will cause your car to not drive straight but at a tilt and your tires will wear prematurely. So if you need to brush up on some tire repair, ask your mechanic straight away.

Using Bondo (Fillers) Instead of Replacing the Part

Filling any damage in with bondo is not bad in itself. If you know what the auto body shop in New Jersey is doing, they tell you, and this is what you are paying for then it is fine.

The problem comes in when you think you are getting a vehicle back that is 99.9% the same as before it was wrecked and it is not. Filling a damaged part in with filler rather than replacing the expensive part is a common tactic and you want to make sure it is not done on your vehicle.

Auto body (Collision Repair and Refinishing)

All damaged parts should be replaced unless you are paying a lower price for the car to just be fixed (in the case you want the cheapest price and do not care about having a car exactly the same as before). Again, you should really speak to your best auto body shop nearest you!

Keep in mind that most auto body repair shops are honest and are surviving in a tough industry.

Jeff what are the three questions should ask a body shop before they consider dropping their car off for repairs? Well what's important is that the repair shop actually be qualified to fix that particular vehicle.

Today modern cars require specialized training and equipment to be able to perform repairs to the manufacturer's standards.

For instance, this Mini Cooper and other BMWs require what's called rivet bonding.

So, glue joints and rivets.

They're actually repaired like aircraft today.

This is important because this maintains the structural integrity the manufacturer designed for a repair situation.

Like this fixture frame bench here that utilizes actual jigs to support the vehicle across its entire platform and place factory components precisely where the manufacturer has designated.

These systems are different than generic systems that simply are reverse engineered and don't have jig and holding capacity.

Shops that aren't trained and equipped to properly perform a repair utilizing generic equipment or generic procedures can't restore the vehicle to the manufacturer's standards and that doesn't necessarily maintain the safety ratingdesigned for the vehicle.

You potentially jeopardize the collision energy management system.

The vehicle might not perform the same in a future collision and you could possibly be more injured than you would if the car doesn't perform as the manufacturer intended.

The second question a consumer should ask is "Where does the body shop's loyalty lie?" Is it an independent repair center that relies on satisfied customers to drive business through their door and therefore fixes vehicles correctly? Or is the body shop on the insurance company's "preferred network?" Those body shops rely on the insurance referrals and when those body shops utilize cheap, imitation, and savage parts utilize the quickest possible repair times and keep costs as low as possible that generates the next referral.

But that's a recipe for shortcuts.

The third question, Paul, is "Can the repair shop make this process convenient for me?" Most consumers today want convenience and ease.

Repair shops that are high-quality repair shops are going to put their customers' interests first & do everything they can to have a satisfied customer.

That includes sheduling a rental car, scheduling a tow engaging in conversations with the insurance company and making sure the vehicle is fixed right for the consumer.

Wheel Alignment and Tire Balancing: Why Are They Important?

The insurance companies nickel and dime them at every turn and they are made to give them at time ridiculous discounts to get any business. That’s why having an auto body shop in your corner can’t be stressed enough.

Nevertheless, all an auto body shop should be on is your side and corners should not be cut at your expense and being watchful is just a smart way to go.

Your Auto Body Shop In New Jersey Should Help You With What Car Needs Exactly?

Autobody Repair

(upbeat music) - Hey, this is Donnie Smith.

Have you ever overground metal, making it too weak and too thin? Well it's not that hard to do with these thinner metals.

What about when working with body filler? Have you ever gotten it in cracks, gaps, other placesthat you don't want it? Takes quite a bit of time to get that out of there and clean it up.

So if you'd like to learn some tricks, how to prevent over-thinning your metal when working with thin metal, and how to keep fromgetting all the body filler in the places you don'twant it in the first place, then you're in luck, because that's what we'regonna show you in this video.

Alright, let's just goahead and get started.

What we're gonna do to eliminate grinding a lot of the metal off,is to use a DA Sander, and we can use 36 grit, or 80.

I'm using 80 here.

That usually works well.

May take just a little bit longer to remove the paint coatings, but you're not gonna chancegrinding too much metal off.

This does not take the amountof metal that grinding does.

Now with thinner metals,I would recommend this.

Now if you're working on older vehicles, grinding may be a little quicker, and that may still work fine.

Okay, now for the tip of how to eliminate getting body filler in places you don't want it, and that's simply to mask it off.

On the edge, I don't want the body filler wrapping around the edgewhere I have to clean it up, so I'm gonna mask that off.

Any gaps, for instance here, there's a, where the molding goes, I don't want body filler to wrap in there where I'm gonna have to sand it out, so I'm gonna use the bodylines that's on the car, and use that as a dividing line to make nice, sharp lines at, so that the body fillerdoes not get in these areas.

(upbeat music) Okay, now I'm mixing thebody filler up in the tube.

I'm gonna let the air out of the cap, so that it'll mix well.

And once I remove some of the air, I'll put the cap back on, and now I'm just gonnamix it inside the tube, because this hardener reallydoes separate a lot in there.

If you don't do this, you'll have liquid-ysubstance that comes out, and you don't want that, so be sure that you mixit up well in the tube before you use it.

Now I've already got somebody filler out here, and I used a paint stick toput some on this mixing board.

And I'm gonna get this hardener, I'm gonna apply a stripfrom edge of the body filler to the other, and that usually is a pretty good mixing ratio.

And notice I'm using a spreader to mix it.

I'm not using a paint stick to stir it, because that could put air bubbles in it.

If you get air bubblesin your body filler, that's gonna create pinholes, whenever you go to sanding body filler.

So it's always best towork the air bubbles out.

Just spread it out on your filler until it's nice and uniform.

You don't want there tobe any hardener streaks.

You wanna mix it until it's one color.

(upbeat music) Okay, now I have the filler mixed good.

It's nice, uniform, one color.

We don't have any hardener streaks in it, so we know that it's mixed well.

I'm gonna apply the body filler.

Now to do this, I'm gonnaapply a tight coat first, and what that is, iswhere I take a thin coat of body filler, and push really hard down on the spreader, so thatI push it into the metal.

That helps it adhere better to the metal, so that you don't have any problems with adhesion at a later point.

Now once I get the tight coat on, I come back with a fill coat, and that's where I'm gonnaput a little bit less pressure on the spreader, which allows it to fill the damaged area in.

(upbeat music) Okay I have the fill coat applied.

Now here's a tip for you to eliminate a lot of the sanding, and that is to work on your edges, because if you have real hard edges, it's gonna take more sanding.

So what I'm doing here, is I'm using the spreader, and on the edges I'm kind of feathering that body filler out, so that edge is a real thin layer, and you don't have that big, hard edge to try to sand out.

Okay, now let this setup for just a little bit, and you don't want to do it immediately after you apply the body filler.

You wanna let the filler set, but you don't want it to be dry either.

But as it's kind of in its green state, go ahead and pull the tape off.

This will leave you nice clean edges.

And also before it fully cures, you can block sand lightly, you don't wanna sand too hard, just to help level someof the highs and lows.

Okay, now I allow it to dry, and started block sanding it.

Now I'm starting out with 36 grit, because that's gonna levelthe filler really fast, but notice that I'mstaying within the filler.

My block is not slidingout onto the paint, because I don't want those deep scratches getting onto the paint surface.

I'm just wanting to level the filler.

(upbeat music) Also notice that I'm sandingin different directions.

I'm not just going at oneangle the entire time.

So I change it up.

And what sanding indifferent directions does, is it's gonna help youget a more level surface.

So always sand in different directions.

(upbeat music) (sanding) (upbeat music) Once you have it level, switch to 80 grit.

That's what I'm doing here.

First, I'm gonna apply some guide coat, and this just to helpidentify highs and lows, and you'll know whenever you get rid of the 36 grit scratches.

Makes it easier to see this way.

Now also notice I am sandingout on the paint a little bit.

I'm not going too far, but you do wanna sand out further than you did with your 36 grit.

You wanna make sure all 36 grit scratches are removed during this step.

(upbeat music) Okay I finished blocking, and I'm feeling for high areas.

And usually if you seemetal spot areas like this, that's gonna indicate that it is high.

And that happens sometimes, and if it does, what you need to do is get your pick hammer, and lightly tap down on those metal areas.

And what this is gonna do, is it's gonna lower that metal.

(upbeat music) And here's another tip for you.

If you're having problemsfilling the bodywork, and determining highs and lows with your hand, with your bare hand, use something like this, a wipe all, or a towel or somethingto put between the panel and your hand.

And this may help you be able to feel the highs andthe lows much better.

Now I'm gonna use the tape, because I'm gonna be applying some putty, so I'm gonna do the same thingI did with the body filler, the edges, and that indention where the body side molding goes.

I'm gonna tape all that off, to keep all the filler out of that.

Now when using putty, it lays out a littlethinner than body filler, so I usually just go halfway, rather than from one edgeof the filler to the other.

So I'm gonna do about halfthe amount of hardener.

(upbeat music) But everything else is basically the same.

Mix it until it's one uniform color.

Don't want any streaks in there.

And the good thing aboutputty is it's thinner, and it's easier to get a nice skim coat, but you do wanna do the tight coat, followed by a fill coat.

And another thing about a putty, is you can go over the entire repair area, from paint edge to paint edge, and that helps any imperfections you had in your sanding flaws, or sanding scratches,or anything like that, it's gonna fill in.

(upbeat music) And after allowing it tosetup for a few minutes, now I'm gonna peel the tape.

(upbeat music) Now when sanding finish putty, I'm not gonna start out with 36 grit.

I'm gonna start out withthe 80 to level it out.

And also I wanna let it fully dry.

I really don't wanna try to sand putty in its green state, so I'llallow it to dry all the way.

Then I'm gonna get 80 on a block, and I'm gonna sand it.

And I'm gonna cross sand it.

Make sure it's good and level.

(upbeat music) Once I have it leveled with 80, I'm gonna use the guide coat, and then I'm gonna comeback with 150 to 180.

I'm using 150 here I believe, but anywhere between 180and 150 will work fine for smoothing out your 80 grit scratches.

And this guide coat, it will help you identify any lows that you may have if there are any, or let you know whenever you got all the 80 grit scratches sanded out.

(upbeat music) And one last thing you wanna do, before you send it offto start priming it, you wanna make sure it fits.

Make sure everything aligns.

Make sure that your body work is right.

So you're gonna have toput it up to the car, and make sure everything works.

(upbeat music) Always, thanks for watching this video.

Be sure and share it with your friends.

Give us a thumbs up, a like, and be sure to subscribe to our channel.

Also be sure to go to CollisionBlast.

Com.

And there we have hours of free autobody and painttraining videos like this one, and a lot of other resources for you.

Thanks again for watching.

Have a safe and productive week, and we'll see you in the next video.

(upbeat music).

The Importance of Proper Wheel Alignment


Best Auto Body Shop in New Jersey